Our New Home
        About Us
 

For over two decades, our Shishu Home has been functioning out of its buildings in Ulsoor, where the children grew up in the proximity of theatres, parks and places of cultural interest. But over the years, the quality of life within city limits dropped considerably due to high pollution and heavy congestion. There was no space left for children to play. The distance between the Home and the school which normally took 25 minutes became an ordeal of one hour in the morning and in the evening.

Taking all this into consideration in 2010 we acquired a land of 36.000 sft. for the construction of a new home and in 2013 we could ultimately move in. The Home is located about 2 km from our school which the children can easily reach by walk or by bicycle. It comprises of three units for the school going children and one unit for babies and pre-school children and in each unit there are three rooms around a common hall and two bathrooms with attached toilets. The increased space is impressive, but the main difference to the old Home lies in the composition of the groups, previously age-wise groups and now mixed groups, that is, all ages are found in one unit like in a real family. Every unit has a housemother who takes care of all aspects of the children except cooking, which is still done centrally. Also outside the units the Home offers plenty of space and facilities like a central courtyard for the little ones, a kitchen and dining hall, several store rooms, guest rooms, and a residential flat for the chief housemother - to mention the main improvements. The greatest eye-catcher is of course the large play area for the children in front and in the back of the building, where they can play basketball, volleyball, football and what not to their heart's content.

Another important change in comparison to the old Home is the concentration on only girls. Due to the more and more stringent demands of the government we ultimately yielded - a big step away from our original concept of a family as the ideal model - and excluded our big boys from our Home. The three small boys who are still with us we will keep till they reach the age of 10 years. At that time we will individually decide where to direct them. Most probably they will be able to join their mothers again who should have stabilised their lives after having been given a support of six to seven years by our care for their sons.

Much as the children mourned the cosiness of the old Home, they embraced the new Home with open hearts once they had discovered the unlimited possibilities of playing, running and screaming - and having a corner for oneself when it is needed. It is indeed a Home to give life to generations of children who oud otherwise be lingering on without hope.


September 2014